Archive for May, 2010

Why Blog? Saturday, May 22nd, 2010

“The faintest writing is stronger than the strongest memory.” – Chinese proverb

Why do I Blog? I get asked this question a lot. Yes, it takes a lot of time and brain cells, both of which I have a very limited supply. To blog regularly requires tons of research, fact checking, writing, and editing. It is hard work.

I don’t blog for the money since my blog is free. I don’t measure my success by the number of visitors to my site, yet I have many. The answer is that I blog to help people. And I suppose that sounds a little high-minded. But, of all the things that I do, including teaching at a university, running my own company, consulting with entrepreneurs, writing books, and speaking at conferences, blogging has the biggest impact of all.

Blogging is my way to share with others who know me and with others who I will never speak with or meet. Some like to call this “thought leadership”, which is a very uppity term. For me, it is the best way to communicate clearly with my target audience with my audience being people who want to learn more about marketing, sales, and negotiation.

Because I blog, I have been invited to speak at conferences, quoted in the national press, and have been interviewed on MSNBC. My motivation is not fame, rather it is the desire to teach and help others. Certainly a by-product of my success as a blogger includes book sales, paid speaking engagements, and consulting. This helps me pay the bills, which is important with two kids in college.

Seemingly every day my phone rings, or I get e-mails from people who I have never met before. They read my blog and want to share an idea or ask a question. That interchange is a thrill to me and is its own reward. This is why I blog.

John Bradley Jackson
Top Dog

The BirdDog Group
© Copyright 2010
All rights reserved.

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John Bradley Jackson Interview Tuesday, May 18th, 2010

Recently I was interviewed by Ashley Wirthlin from the Public Relations Blogger. We talked about marketing and PR in the new normal of 2010 and how things have changed.

Here is a snippet and a link to the blog.

“Niche marketing is about choosing a market that is overlooked or under-served… A marketplace that is served by the big companies, by mass marketers, typically will look over opportunities simply because they’re too small.”

John Bradley Jackson Interview – May 2010

John Bradley Jackson
Top Dog

The BirdDog Group
© Copyright 2010
All rights reserved.

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How to Classify Social Media End Users Saturday, May 15th, 2010

While social media remains an evolving story, the players are taking shape when you observe what they do on the web. As my psychotherapist friend (yes, we are just friends) says, “behavior predicts behavior.”

In fact, there are six categories of social media users and these types are usually grouped according to their activities. Check this out:

http://www.mediasocial.org/

John Bradley Jackson
Top Dog

The BirdDog Group
© Copyright 2010
All rights reserved.

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“It Is Better to Know Some of the Questions Than All of the Answers.” Sunday, May 9th, 2010

James Thurber, author and cartoonist, said that many years ago and it is true today.

Selling is not about what you say to the customer, but rather it is about the questions you ask. Many salespeople are in love with their own words and ideas. They are often described as having the “gift of gab” which means that they really just talk too much. Instead of asking open-ended questions and listening, talkative salespeople talk too much.

They ramble on and on about product features to fill the dead air (which is extremely uncomfortable for a talkative person). Worse yet, they invariably talk about themselves, which is the last thing that the buyer wants to hear.

Meanwhile, the buyer ultimately buys from the seller who best understands their problems or needs. Of course, you don’t get to understand the buyer’s needs by talking. Great salespeople ask questions to learn about the buyer’s motivations, concerns, and desires. It is really that simple.

Ask questions to discover what matters most to the customer. If you must speak, then talk about what matters most to the customer.

John Bradley Jackson
Top Dog

The BirdDog Group
© Copyright 2010
All rights reserved.

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